Bugatti Veyron

The Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 is a rear mid-engined Supercar. The Super Sport version is the fastest road-legal car in the world, with a top speed of 431.07 km/h (267.85 mph). The original version has a top speed of 408.00 km/h (253.52 mph). Designed and developed by the German Volkswagen Group and produced by Bugatti Automobiles SAS at their headquarters in Château St. Jean in Molsheim (Alsace, France), the Veyron's chief designer was Hartmut Warkuss, and the exterior was designed by Jozef Kabaň of Volkswagen, with much of the engineering work being conducted under the guidance of former Peterbilt engineer and now Bugatti Engineering chief Wolfgang Schreiber. The car is named after French racing driver Pierre Veyron, who won the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1939 while racing for the original Bugatti company. It was named Car of the Decade (2000–2009) by the BBC television programme Top Gear. A number of special variants have been produced, including two targa tops. In December 2010, Bugatti began offering prospective buyers the ability to customize exterior and interiors colors by using the Veyron 16.4 Configurator application on the marque's official website.

The top speed of the original version was verified by James May on Top Gear in November 2006, again at Volkswagen Group's private Ehra-Lessien test track. Jeremy Clarkson, driving a Veyron from Italy to London, noted that at top speed the engine consumes 45,000 litres (9,900 imp gal) of air per minute (as much as a human breathes in four days). The Veyron has the fastest top speed of any street legal production car. Once back in the Top Gear studio, James was asked by co-presenter Jeremy Clarkson what the Veyron felt like to drive at 407 km/h (253 mph), May replied that it was "totally undramatic", and very stable at speed. It only wobbled slightly as the air brake moved in the vertical position to slow the car down at lower speeds. A chrome Veyron in the UK German inspection officials recorded an average top speed of 408.47 km/h (253.81 mph)[5] during test sessions on the Ehra-Lessien test track on 19 April 2005. On 4 July 2010, Bugatti's official test driver Pierre Henri Raphanel piloted the Super Sport edition and was clocked at an average of 431.072 km/h (267.856 mph) on the same track, taking back the title from the SSC Ultimate Aero TT as the fastest production vehicle of all time. The 431.072 km/h mark was reached by averaging the Super Sport's two test runs, the first topping out at 427.93 km/h (265.90 mph) and the second at 434.20 km/h (269.80 mph). The record run was certified by the German government and the Guinness Book of World Records.

Bugatti veyron endowed with W16 engine-16 cylinders in 4 banks of 4 cylinders fed by four turbochargers, a dual-clutch DSG computer-controlled manual transmission, the Veyron has a length is 4462 mm (175.8 in) a wide of 1998 mm (78.7 in) and hight of 1206 mm (47.5 in). Counting a sum of 10 radiators, for the engine cooling system, for transmission oil, a heat exchanger for the air to liquid intercoolers, for engine oil etc., the car has a power to weight ratio of 529 bhp/tonne . It has the fastest acceleration speed, reaching 60 mph in 2.6 seconds.


The Veyron's brakes use cross drilled, radially vented carbon fibre reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite discs, manufactured by SGL Carbon, which have a much greater resistance to brake fade when compared with conventional cast iron discs. The lightweight aluminium alloy monobloc brake calipers are made by AP Racing; the fronts have eight titanium pistons and the rear calipers have six pistons. Bugatti claims maximum deceleration of 1.3 g on road tires. As an added safety feature, in the event of brake failure, an anti-lock braking system (ABS) has also been installed on the handbrake. Prototypes have been subjected to repeated 1.0 g braking from 312 km/h (194 mph) to 80 km/h (50 mph) without fade. With the car's acceleration from 80 km/h (50 mph) to 312 km/h (194 mph), that test can be performed every 22 seconds. At speeds above 200 km/h (120 mph), the rear wing also acts as an airbrake, snapping to a 55° angle in 0.4 seconds once brakes are applied, providing an additional 0.68 g (6.66 m/s2) of deceleration (equivalent to the stopping power of an ordinary hatchback).[9] Bugatti claims the Veyron will brake from 400 km/h (250 mph) to a standstill in less than 10 seconds, though distance covered in this time will be half of a kilometer (third of a mile).

Every once in a while you come across something that is so luxuriously superior and elegantly sexy that you can’t keep you mind off of it. I’m referring to something that is so extravagantly beautiful and dynamically robust that it deserves all of the hype that surrounds it. I’m talking about a car that has been described as “the fastest most powerful and most expensive road car the world has ever seen”. If you still don’t know what I’m talking about then allow me to introduce you to a super sportscar which has been praised as “the greatest automobile ever made”, the Bugatti Veyron. Before you continue onwards I should mention that if your financial standing is not approaching “island buying” status then the only relationship you will ever have with this car is the same type the deaf have with music, none whatsoever. With that being said I would recommend that you STOP! reading NOW because the Veyron is so painfully untouchable that it’s completely pointless teasing yourself any further.

The Veyron Super Sport features an engine power increase from the standard 1,001 metric horsepower (736 kW; 987 bhp) to 1,200 metric horsepower (883 kW; 1,184 bhp) and torque of 1,500 N·m (1,100 ft·lbf) and a revised aerodynamic package. It was shown publicly for the first time at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in August 2010. Bugatti's official test driver Pierre Henri Raphanel drove the Super Sport version of the Veyron on Volkswagen's Ehra-Lessien high-speed oval to establish the car's top speed. With representatives of the Guinness Book of Records and German Technical Inspection Agency (TÜV) on hand, Raphanel made passes around the big oval in both directions achieving an average maximum speed of 431.072 km/h (267.856 mph). Once produced for sale, the first five Super Sports will sport the same black and orange finish as the first production car, which was used to set the speed record, and all production models will be electronically limited to 415 km/h (258 mph) to protect the tyres.

The Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 is a mid-engine grand tourer developed by the German car-manufacturer Volkswagen and produced by the Volkswagen-brand Bugatti Automobiles SAS at their headquarters in Château St Jean in Molsheim (Alsace, France), and whose production and development is often credited to Ferdinand Karl Piech. It is named after French racing driver Pierre Veyron, who won the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1939 while racing for the original Bugatti company. The Veyron features an 8.0 litre W16 engine — 16 cylinders in two banks of eight cylinders, or the equivalent of two narrow-angle V8 engines mated in a “W” configuration. Each cylinder has four valves for a total of 64, but the narrow staggered 8 configuration allows two overhead camshafts to drive two banks of cylinders so only four camshafts are needed. The engine is fed by four turbochargers and displaces 487.8 cu in. with a 3.4 in × 3.4 in bore and stroke.

A targa top version unveiled at Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance on 15 August 2008, with production beginning in spring 2009. The model has extensive reinforcements to compensate for the lack of standard roof, and small changes to the windshield and running lights. There are two removable tops, the second a temporary roof fashioned after an umbrella. The top speed with the hardtop in place is the same as the standard coupé version, but with the roof down is limited to 369 km/h (229 mph)—and to 130 km/h (81 mph) with the temporary soft roof. The first (chassis 001) was sold at auction, raising approximately $900,000 for charity.

Bugatti Veyron Rating: 4.5 Diposkan Oleh: Surur Syifaus

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